We’re so close!

Gallatin City-County Health Department is gearing up to vaccinate even more residents as we enter Phase 1B of vaccine distribution. We are currently awaiting more doses to be allocated to Gallatin County. 

We do not have appointments available for Phase 1B at this time.

*As we transition into Phase 1B, anyone from Phase 1A is still eligible to get the vaccine.*

Please be patient as we move into this new phase and remember that our vaccine supply remains limited. We will be following the Governor’s plan to help our most vulnerable citizens first. To do so, we’ve established a task force to create guidelines for distributing the limited supply of vaccines. This task force is made up of local healthcare providers, business representatives, and government officials. 

Until the vaccine is more widely available, everyone should continue to follow critical public health protocols including:

  • Avoid crowds
  • Wear a mask in public
  • Maintain at least 6 feet distance from people
  • Wash your hands often
  • Stay home when you’re sick

We will provide additional information on vaccine distributions as soon as they are available. Thank you for your patience.

Frequently Asked Questions

We are transitioning from Phase 1A to Phase 1B. More details will be available on our website and social media accounts soon.

Because we have such a limited amount of the vaccine and the new Phase 1B allows for so many individuals to be eligible, the Gallatin County Vaccine Task Force has prioritized a smaller group of people within Phase 1B.

Priority #1 for Phase 1B:

  • Gallatin County residents over the age of 80.
  • American Indians and people of color.

These groups have statistically proven to be of the highest risk within the Governor’s amended Phase 1B eligible individuals.

The original amendment was made on January 5, 2021 by Governor Greg Gianforte.

Please be patient as we continue to administer the limited supply of vaccine allocated to Gallatin County. Until more people are able to get their vaccine, it is important we continue to follow health guidelines:

  • Wear a mask in public.
  • Maintain at least 6 feet distance from people.
  • Wash your hands often, refrain from touching your face.
  • Stay home when you’re sick.

Currently, vaccine demand far exceeds our supply. Therefore, to ensure transparency and broad community input, the Gallatin City-County Health Department has formed a COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Task Force including representatives from community organizations, health care providers, businesses, and government, to prioritize COVID-19 vaccine distribution.  

In order to achieve the biggest possible impact with our limited supply, the task force developed Phase 1B priorities.

  • Phase 1B Priority #1: Individuals over 80 years of age, American Indians, and people of color. Our first priority is to avoid deaths and hospitalizations in Gallatin County.
    • COVID-19 death rates are much higher with increasing age.
    • In Montana, COVID-19 death rates among American Indian residents are 11.6 times higher than white residents. [1]
    • Average age of death from COVID-19 among American Indian residents is 68 years. The average age of death from COVID-19 among white residents is 82 years. [2]
  • Phase 1B Priority #2 will be evaluated once Priority #1 is nearing completion. 

We do not have a list at this time. The FDA has provided Emergency Use Authorization for the first doses, and those will be given to our most at-risk healthcare workers.  We are making plans to provide the vaccine to the general public once more doses are available. When we know more, we will provide more details on our website, social media, and other outlets.

Please note the ingredients and the FDA Fact Sheet for each vaccine below.

Pfizer COVID-19 Ingredients

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine includes the following ingredients: mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2 [(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose. Food and environmental allergies will not prevent you from getting the Pfizer vaccine.

FDA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers – Pfizer

Moderna COVID-19 Ingredients

Each dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine contains 100 mcg of nucleosidemodified messenger RNA (mRNA), a total lipid content of 1.93 mg (SM-102, polyethylene glycol [PEG] 2000 dimyristoyl glycerol [DMG], cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DSPC]), 0.31 mg tromethamine, 1.18 mg tromethamine hydrochloride, 0.043 mg acetic acid, 0.12 mg sodium acetate, and 43.5 mg sucrose.

FDA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers – Moderna

Both the Pfizer and the Moderna vaccines require two (2) doses. The first dose helps the immune system recognize the virus, and the second dose strengthens the body’s response to the virus.

  • Pfizer requires two doses, three (3) weeks apart.
  • Moderna requires two doses, four (4) weeks apart.

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines do not work together. That means if you get the Pfizer vaccine first, your second dose must also be Pfizer – you cannot get the Pfizer vaccine first and Moderna vaccine second.

Both Pfizer and Moderna will provide you with a card after your first vaccine that will show you when you need your second dose.

Right now, vaccine doses are being given to our most at-risk healthcare workers. Once the vaccine is more widely available, there are just a few restrictions set for each vaccine.

  • Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will be available for individuals over the age of 16. Studies are ongoing to determine the safety of the vaccine in children under 16.
  • Moderna COVID-19 vaccine will be available for individuals over the age of 18. Studies are ongoing to determine the safety of the vaccine in children under 18.
  • Pre-existing health conditions will also be reviewed prior to a vaccine being given.
  • If you are allergic to any ingredients, you should not get the vaccine.

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients should not get the vaccine. Also, if you have an allergic reaction to the first dose of the vaccine, you should not get a second dose.

Pfizer COVID-19 Ingredients

The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine includes the following ingredients: mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2 [(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose. Food and environmental allergies will not prevent you from getting the Pfizer vaccine.

FDA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers – Pfizer

Moderna COVID-19 Ingredients

Each dose of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine contains 100 mcg of nucleosidemodified messenger RNA (mRNA), a total lipid content of 1.93 mg (SM-102, polyethylene glycol [PEG] 2000 dimyristoyl glycerol [DMG], cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DSPC]), 0.31 mg tromethamine, 1.18 mg tromethamine hydrochloride, 0.043 mg acetic acid, 0.12 mg sodium acetate, and 43.5 mg sucrose.

FDA Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers – Moderna

The FDA has reviewed all safety data from the vaccine trials and has set an Emergency Use Authorization for the COVID-19 vaccine.

The COVID-19 vaccines were tested to make sure they meet safety standards. Many people volunteered in trials to see how the vaccines would work with people of different ages, races, and ethnicities. The trials also tested people with different medical conditions.

The FDA and CDC will continue to monitor the safety of the vaccine, to make sure even long-term side effects are documented. If there are safety concerns, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will work to solve any issues.

Because COVID-19 is so new, the possibility for long-term health issues is unknown at this point.

Both this disease and the vaccine are new, and scientists continue to learn about the virus that causes COVID-19 and how to stop the spread. We do not know for sure how long protection lasts for those who get infected versus those who are vaccinated. But, what we do know is that COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people. If you get COVID-19, you also risk giving it to loved ones who may get very sick.

The Pfizer and the Moderna vaccines were tested in large trials done on thousands of volunteers. So far, studies show that immunity from the vaccine seems to last longer than immunity from fighting the natural virus.

It is still recommended that you practice critical public health protocols even after receiving the vaccine.

  • Avoid crowds
  • Wear a mask in public
  • Maintain at least 6 feet distance from people
  • Wash your hands often
  • Stay home when you’re sick

Yes, but maybe not right away. If you have had COVID-19, you may delay 90 days before getting the vaccine. The reason is that natural infection immunity seems to wear out after two to three months. We are hoping that the vaccine will provide longer lasting immunity. So far, the antibody responses to the vaccine seem to last longer than the antibody responses to natural infection.

You should tell the person giving you your COVID-19 vaccination if you have any of the following:

  • Allergies
  • Currently have a fever
  • Bleeding disorder or are on a blood thinner
  • Are immunocompromised or are on a medication that affects your immune system
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • Are breastfeeding
  • Have received a COVID-19 vaccine before

The most common side effects are listed below. These are signs your immune system is working the way it is supposed to work, and that you are building up protection against COVID-19. Any of these symptoms will typically go away within a week. If you have any of these side effects that don’t go away on their own after a week, be sure to contact your primary care physician.

  • Injection site pain
  • Tiredness or fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Joint pain
  • Fever
  • Injection site swelling or redness
  • Nausea
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Generally feeling unwell

No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines currently being developed in the United States have the virus that causes COVID-19 in them. If you happen to get infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after you received the vaccine, you could still get COVID-19. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection from the virus.

Sometimes people get a fever or feel tired for a day or so after getting a vaccine. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building immunity. It usually takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination.

No. The COVID-19 vaccines will not cause you to test positive on a viral test (like a swab test) that looks for current COVID-19 infection. You may test positive on an antibody test, this is because one of the ways that vaccines work is to teach your body to make antibodies.

No. The unique nature of COVID-19 has required a unique response when it comes to a vaccine. Moderna and Pfizer have created a vaccine which uses messenger RNA (mRNA). A nucleic acid, mRNA is responsible for guiding how your body responds to an invading organism like this virus. In action, the Moderna and Pfizer vaccinations will allow mRNA to create the antibodies necessary to defend the virus that causes COVID-19 without the need to inject virus particles into the body.

No. You will still need to follow the critical public health protocols until public health officials say otherwise.

Here’s why:

  • Both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses, given 3-4 weeks apart.
  • The effect of a vaccine is not immediate. Your immune system needs time to build up antibodies in order to fight off the virus.
  • You are expected to have some level of protection after the first dose, but full protection may not come for weeks after the second dose – up to two months or more after your first dose.
  • Once vaccine doses are readily available for public use, it could still take several months to get vaccines to hundreds of millions of people.

The federal government has established the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF). This will help make sure the COVID-19 vaccine is distributed free of charge to providers around the state. Some providers may or may not charge a fee when administering the vaccine to you. More information will be known about the cost and fees of the vaccine by the end of January 2021.

More Information on COVID-19 Vaccines

COVID-19

EXPLORE MORE:

Governor's Face Covering Directive
COVID-19 printable resources
Governor Bullock's Reopening MT phased approach
Governor Bullock's Guidelines and Considerations for Reopening Businesses and Schools
Governor Bullock's Guidelines and Considerations for Reopening Businesses and Schools