Home Visiting

Family Health

//Home Visiting
Home Visiting2019-05-09T15:15:28+00:00

Parenting is a tough job! We’re here to help.

Nobody enters parenthood knowing exactly what to do. The joy is wonderful, but becoming a new parent can be overwhelming. Don’t worry, you’re not meant to do this alone!

The Healthy Gallatin Home Visiting program is here to help families from prenatal care to children up to age 8. Our home visitors each have a specialty, including dads who can help other dads with their own unique challenges. We’re here to make your life easier, whether that means answering simple questions, help in understanding development milestones, teaching parenting tricks or simply going for a walk in the park. We can also help with accessing healthcare coverage or other community resources.

The program is free and open to everyone, regardless of income or background. Our goal is to help parents gain the confidence and support needed for infant and parent health, mental health, child development and overall well-being for the family.

There is no wrong reason to access our services; being pregnant, having a newborn baby or small children are the only reasons you need.

Give us a call we would love to talk! 406.582.3100.

Refer Someone

Do you know someone who may need support during pregnancy or with parenting? Health care providers, family, and friends can refer someone to the Healthy Gallatin Home Visiting program by filling out the form below, or individuals can fill it out for a self-referral. You can mail the form to us at Gallatin City County Health Department at 215 W Mendenhall, Bozeman, MT 59715 or fax to: (406) 582-3112.

Home Visiting Referral Form

Family Health

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QUESTIONS?

Please contact us at:
(406) 582-3100 or HS@gallatin.mt.gov

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